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Presentations
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Developing the North American permanent magnet and materials supply chain for energy technologies: Industry and government perspectives

This panel discussion will focus on both government and industry efforts to develop a robust North American supply chain of permanent magnets to support the energy sector industrial base (ESIB). Rare earth magnets, such as sintered neodymium-iron-boron (NdFeB) magnets, are especially important to the ESIB as they are critical components of traction motors in electric vehicles and direct drive generators in offshore wind turbines. Yet, nearly all supply chain stages of sintered NeFeB magnets are concentrated in China, posing a potential vulnerability for ESIB supply chains required to meet climate goals.

Moderator: Braeton J. Smith, Argonne National Laboratory

Panelists:
Helena Khazdozian, Advanced Manufacturing & Materials Technology Office, U.S. Department of Energy
Salim Bhabhrawala, Critical Materials Program Manager, Office of Manufacturing & Energy Supply Chains, U.S. Department of Energy
Alan Lund, MP Materials
Frank Johnson, Chief Technology Officer, Niron Magnetics

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Faster EV Charging, Extended Range, and Propagation Prevention through Advanced Thermal Management

Electric Vehicle, ePlane, eVTOL, and Maritime OEMs have several similar goals relating to battery thermal management. This presentation addresses the current significant topics.

With the first generations of EVs, the primary goal was to quickly get a car on the road that met the basic consumer needs in terms of reliability and performance. With the next generation of EVs, the OEMs are looking for optimized vehicles in terms of weight/driving range, cell-cycle lifetime, and safety (up to and including cell-to-cell propagation control). Battery pack manufacturers now use four primary strategies to prevent Thermal Runaway. All four will be discussed along with the impact of each on fast charging, cell performance, and cell lifetime. As a thin and lightweight thermal management material, flexible graphite heat spreaders are used to improve charging rate, cell cycle lifetime, driving range, and establish propagation prevention in both pouch and prismatic cell battery packs, while making the packs smaller and lighter. Five factors control how fast an EV can be charged. Only one of them can be easily controlled and all will be discussed.

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Government Efforts Towards Securing a Clean Energy Supply Chain

Helena will provide a full-scale picture and analysis of the domestic and global investment climate surrounding the clean energy transition. His presentation will focus on U.S. government investments in critical materials, private domestic supply chain investments, and how the U.S. Government is addressing critical material supply chain shortfalls from both the domestic and international allies perspectives. Mr. Bhabhrawala will also highlight other global efforts to mitigate energy sector industrial base supply chain vulnerabilities.

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Graphene enhanced thermal interface materials for electronics cooling applications

Graphene, due to its exceptional mechanical, optical, electrical, physical and thermal properties, has attracted strong interest for both fundamental studies and real applications. Among all these properties, the extraordinary high thermal conductivity makes graphene an ideal cooling material for power devices and systems. In mean time, the rapid growth of information technology continues to increase power density and integration levels in electronics devices, leading to an increase in greater heat dissipation, lower performance, and shorter operating life.

In this talk, the experimental results and potential applications scenario are given. It is shown that this kind of new class thermal interface material can be used for many large power and high density cooling applications.

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High-Performance Thermally Conductive Low Dielectric Constant Ceramics for Thermal Management in Electronics Packaging

Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) stands out as one of the premier ceramic fillers for enhancing thermal conductivity (TC) in polymeric thermal management materials. This enhancement is achieved without compromising the polymer’s electrical insulation or signal transmission. Thermal interface materials (TIM) filled with BN are prevalently used in electronic packaging, enabling efficient heat dissipation without compromising electrical insulation.

While integrating BN considerably boosts the TC of neat resins, our internal research into dielectric properties (like dielectric strength and dielectric constant) reveals that BN-filled polymer composites retain almost the same exemplary dielectric performance as unfilled polymer resins.

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Low Temperature Metal Additive Manufacturing for Heat Exchangers

Over the last few years, 3D printing has promised designers freedom of geometry. Solid state (no melting) 3D printing processes are now allowing freedom of material. New processes leverage ultrasonic energy to produce metallurgical bonds between layers of metal foils near room temperature. This low temperature attribute of the process enables printing multiple metals in one part, creating complex internal channels, and embedding electronics into solid metal. These attributes have been leveraged to create millions of electrification components in the automotive space – both electrical busbars and complex heat exchangers.

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Panel: Innovations and Challenges in Next-Generation Thermal Materials

As technology continues to advance, the demand for more powerful and compact electronic devices is on the rise. Efficient heat management is crucial for ensuring the optimal performance and reliability of these devices. This panel will explore the latest developments in Next-Generation Thermal Materials that play a pivotal role in enhancing heat dissipation and thermal conductivity. Experts from industry and academia will discuss innovative materials, fabrication techniques, and the challenges associated with implementing these materials in various applications. Join us to gain insights into how thermal interface materials can address the thermal management needs of emerging technologies such as high-performance computing, 5G, electric vehicles, and more.

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The Compatibility Imperative in Liquid Cooling for EV Charging Applications

This presentation is focused on educating engineers about the wetted loop for liquid cooling in EV systems and the imperative for chemical compatibility of all components. Engineers will learn how to identify and and mitigate risks associated with material compatibility issues. While the examples for this presentation are framed for EV charging or battery swap system design engineers, the information on component specification, material selection, chemical compatibility and incompatibility consequences is relevant for all engineers designing liquid cooling systems regardless of application or market.

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Thermal Management of High Heat Flux Electronics using Hybrid Two-Phase Cooling System

The rapid miniaturization of electronic components has resulted in severe limitations in the
thermal management of modern and high heat flux devices. While air-cooled systems and single-
phase liquid cooling systems are not effective thermal management solutions for high heat flux
applications, even advanced two-phase cooling technologies encounter limitations. Capillary-
driven evaporation from wicks, a technology used in heat pipes and vapor chambers, has been
identified as an effective cooling mechanism for removing a large amount of heat without the
need for a mechanical pump.

To address the challenge posed by standalone two-phase cooling technology in high heat flux
applications, Advanced Cooling Technologies, Inc. has developed a novel hybrid two-phase
cooling system (HTPCS) that integrates the benefits of capillary-driven evaporation from wicks
and mechanically pumped two-phase cooling.

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